From the Branch Manager

“We’re back! 

After over a year of closing our doors to our customers due to the pandemic, we re-opened again on May 4th this year. Through being closed and having to adapt to a new normal, library staff have persevered through it all. Like many other work places, we have had staffing changes occur, but our new team members are a great addition to the Oak Lawn Library family.  

While we enjoyed our time delivering to your cars with Curbside To Go, we have been overjoyed at being able to see everyone in our building again. Some things have changed like the way customers check out using our new Self-Checkout machines! They are slightly different than the one we used to have, but we are here to teach all customers on how to use them.

SMART Summer is still going on and we are excited for kids and adults to read and get their prizes. A very cool and exciting service that the Dallas Public Library System is rolling is our Laptop+Wifi Bundles! 

While the bundles themselves can only be picked up at 20 library branches, customers can visit any branch (like ours) and have us put a hold on a bundle for them to pick up at one of those designated branches! We also have hotspots available that can be put on hold and sent to any location in the system.

Programs are still being done virtually, and our branch is still hosting our monthly book club, Novel Discussions via Zoom for now.  While not all things are back to the normal that was, our passion and goal to serve our community is as strong as ever.  “

Gabriela Montantes, Library Manager Oak Lawn Library

North Texas Day of Giving Sept 23, 2021

The Oak Lawn Library Friends will be participating in the North Texas Day of Giving on Sept. 23, 2021.   This event funds our subscription to Book Pages, our website, and Smart Summer programs. Early giving starts on Sept. 1st.

 You can use this link to go directly to our donation page at the North Texas Day of Giving: https://www.northtexasgivingday.org/oak-lawn-library-friends

Book Page

          Are you looking for new books to read?  Book Pages is a new source for new books that are just coming out.   The Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF) has increased our monthly subscription from 50 to 100 per month.  They are available in the library at the reference desk.            

Online Services at DPL

          Several library services are available at the DPL website at the following location:

http://dallaslibrary2.org/covid-19/dplathome.php

          I have been using Hoopla for streaming TV shows and movies.   It also has audio books and music albums. 

You can also use Overdrive:  http://dallaslibrary2.org/services/ebooks/index.php#overdrive  for downloadable media.

Art News

Upcoming Virtual Art Shows for 2021

          While the library is partially open with no programs, we have decided to keep our art shows and exhibits online to our website.  

          The new schedule for art exhibits and the art show are as follows:

August – Duke Horn

September – Vidya Lakshmi

October – Melinda Randall


November – Josiah Lucas Marciano

December – Karen Anderson

Tom Thumb Good Neighbor Rewards

If you shop at Tom Thumb, you can link your Tom Thumb Rewards card with Good Neighbor Charity #2923. OLLF will get 1% of money you spend at Tom Thumb. For more information, visit Tom Thumb’s Good Neighbor Program webpage.

Kroger Community Rewards Program

It is easy to continue your support every time you shop and use your Shopper’s Card. Just login to Kroger.com/CommunityRewards and select # 41560 which is the Oak Lawn Library Friends number.

You need to renew your selection starting in August.  It does not increase your grocery bill, but it does benefit the library

Book Festivals – Online

          My book festivals have gone online this past year due to Covid19.   Here is a link to Book Festivals in the US by State.

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/book-festivals-in-the-us-by-state/

 Online Resources for Book Lovers

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/on-line-resources-dallas-public-library-and-other-sources/

 Join the Oak Lawn Library Friends

 Why the Friends?

The Oak Lawn Library Friends was formed to assist the branch in meeting the needs of all its patrons. The Friends actively support the branch by:

  • Encouraging donations and volunteering
  • Organizing and hosting programs and special events
  • Volunteering at the direction of the branch manager
  • Publicizing OLLF activities to the media and patrons
  • Advocating for the branch and the Dallas Public Library system

Membership levels are:
  
Student/Senior Citizen: $6    

Sustaining: $20

Household: $25   

Close Friend: $75     

Corporate: $250   

Memorial/Other Contribution: any amount.

If paying by check, please make it payable to: Oak Lawn Library Friends (OLLF).

Website

          Since our last newsletter, the Oak Lawn Library Friends website has been updated and expanded.     

The website has information on authors and book festivals in the US.

There is even a link to NPR’s list of top books for 2020.

There are currently over 2150 author pages on the website and the list is updated weekly.

Suggested Books to read this summer

          Looking for something new to read?   Are you tired of reruns on TV, or looking for an excuse to stay home and read a book in print or on your e-reader?  The Dallas Public Library is filled with tens of thousands of new books that cover just about any interest.  

Non-Fiction

The Looting Machine by Tom Burgis.  Tom Burgis is a reporter who usually writes for the Financial Times.  

In this book, Tom recounts how local government officials with the help of foreign corporations have looted the wealth of Africa and lined their pockets while the citizens of these African countries are poor , starving and have little health care.   

While this looting began during colonial times, the looting has vastly increased in scale with the discovery of oil, natural gas, diamonds, copper and other metals.

You can check on his other book by using this link:

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/tom-burgis/s

Garden and Grove by John Dixon Hunt – a lecture series about the influence of Italian gardens on English gardens in the 17th & 18th century.   An interesting look at how touring gardens in Italy had a major impact on gardens in England.

For about this author, check out this link below:

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/john-dixon-hunt/

Furious Hours by Casey Cep.  A non-fiction account of a serial murderer in Alabama and the book that Harper Lee never wrote.   An African American preacher in Alabama bought insurance on his relatives and then systematically killed them and collected on the policies.  It is a fascinating story that intrigued Harper Lee. This book talks about how she tried and failed to write that book.

Here is a link to the author’s page on the OLLF website: https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/casey-cep/

Fiction

The Consequences of Fear by Jacqueline Winspear.   Set in 1941 in London and Kent, this latest Masie Dobbs mystery is another good read.   Starting with a young messenger seeing an apparent murder, to Masie’s work with the SOE, this keeps you glued to the page. 

Here is a link to Jacqueline Winspear’s author page on the OLLF website:

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/jacqueline-winspear/

Deadly Harvest by Michael Stanley.   The 4th Detective Kubu murder mystery set in Botswana.    An interesting mix of police work and the belief in the power of witch doctors makes for a novel setting for a murder mystery.  

For further information on Michael Stanley, check out the author page on the OLLF website at:

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/michael-stanley/

Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens.   A novel about a young girl who is abandoned by her family in the early 1960’s.  She lives by herself on the Outer Banks of NC.   It is an unusual novel with some surprising twists to keep you glued to the page.

For further information on Delia Owens, you can check her author page at:

https://oaklawnlibraryfriends.com/delia-owens/

This page includes information about her non-fiction books and a YouTube interview about “Where the Crawdads Sing”.