Agatha Christie was born in Ashfield. Agatha grew up in the town of Torquay in southwest England. She taught herself how to read at five years old even though her mother didn’t want her to do so until she was eight. She was home-schooled, which was a lot more uncommon at the turn of the 20th century than it is now. Her father was her primary teacher, but her mother was a storyteller—and gave strong encouragement for Agatha to write. Although she became a prolific writer, she claimed she really did not have much in the way of lessons other than arithmetic.

Although she did not have the social experience of public school, she studied dance and piano as a teenager. She was too shy to perform. Her first published writing happened when she was 11. It was a poem about electric trams. She was very clever at inventing ways to keep occupied. She has been quoted as saying, “There is nothing like boredom to inspire you to write.” She had written a number of short stories by the time she was 17.

In 1910, at 20, Christie spent winter months in Egypt with her mother. Her time there influenced the rest of her life. In 1914, she married Archibald Christie, who was a Lt. Colonel. Archibald returned to