Charles Townsend Copeland (April 27, 1860 – July 24, 1952) was a professor, poet, and writer.

He graduated from Harvard University and spent much of his time as a mentor at Harvard, where he served in several posts, including Boylston Professor of Rhetoric from 1925 to 1928.[1] He also worked as a part-time theater critic. Known as “Copey” by many of his peers and admirers, he became known for his Harvard poetry readings in the 1930s.[2][3] In her autobiography, The Story of My Life, Helen Keller paid high praise to Copeland as an instructor.[citation needed] He also taught at the Harvard Extension School.[4]

Books in order of publication:

Copeland’s Treasury for Booklovers: A Panorama of English and American Poetry and Prose from the Earliest Times to the Present Part One1930
Copeland’s Treasury for Booklovers: A Panorama of English and American Poetry and Prose from the Earliest Times to the Present Volume II1931
Copeland’s Treasury for Booklovers: A Panorama of English and American Poetry and Prose from the Earliest Times to the Present Volume III1931
Copeland’s Treasury for Booklovers: A Panorama of English and American Poetry and Prose from the Earliest Times to the Present Volume IV1931
Copeland’s Treasury for Booklovers: A Panorama of English and American Poetry and Prose from the Earliest Times to the Present Volume V1931
Letters to His Youngest Sister1968
Edwin Booth2006
Selections from Byron, Wordsworth, Shelley, Keats and Browning;2015
Representative Biographies of English Men of Letters2015
Freshman English and Theme-Correcting in Harvard College2015